Episode 560: “Jolly Jane” Toppan: Angel of Mercy (Part 1) Image

Episode 560: “Jolly Jane” Toppan: Angel of Mercy (Part 1)

2 May - 1 hour 33 mins explicit
Podcast Series Morbid

When Jane Toppan began training to be a nurse at Cambridge Hospital in 1885, she was bright, eager, and well-liked by her peers and seemed to form easy bonds with the oldest and most vulnerable patients. What no one knew at the time was, once Jane managed to get time alone with her patients, she began conducting medical experiments by injecting them with various drugs and even going so far as to get into bed with them to hold them close to her as they died from the overdoses she’d administered.

Thank you to the amazing Dave White of Bring me the Axe Podcast for research!

References

Boston Globe. 1902. "Agree that she's insane." Boston Globe, April 6: 1.

—. 1901. "Alden P. Davis' death du...

1 hour 33 mins

Series Episodes

Episode 575: Veronica Gedeon & the Easter Sunday Murders (Part 1)

Episode 575: Veronica Gedeon & the Easter Sunday Murders (Part 1)

explicit

On the afternoon of March 28, 1937, Easter Sunday, Joseph Gedeon and his daughter, Ethel, arrived at the home of Gedeon’s wife, Mary, for a planned Easter dinner. The Gedeon’s had been separated for some time but had agreed to have dinner together as a family, which included their other daughter, Veronica, a moderately successful pulp magazine model. When they entered the apartment, it appeared as though no one was home; however, upon checking the bedroom where his daughter slept, Joseph Gedeon found the nude body of his daughter lying lifeless on the bed and immediately called the police. During an initial search of the apartment, investigators found the body of Mary Gedeon stuffed under her bed; like her daughter, she had been strangled to death. In a third bedroom, police also found the body of Mary’s boarder, Frank Byrnes, who’d been stabbed several times in the head and neck with a long, thin implement. There was no sign of a forced entry, no sign of a struggle, and nothing appeared to be missing from the apartment. Given that Veronica had been found nude, and Mary was clothed but her underwear had been torn away, investigators assumed the murders were a sex crime. Still caught in the grip of the Great Depression, New Yorkers welcomed anything that could distract from the unpleasant realities of daily life and the salacious murder of a pulp magazine model—a sex crime, no less—was exactly what they were looking for. The story dominated the press, as reporters and tabloid journalists dug into Veronica’s personal life and dating history and published lurid photos from her past. But when the killer was finally caught and the motive revealed, the story was far stranger and tragic than anyone had imagined. Thank you to the wonderful David White of the Bring Me the Axe Podcast for research! References Brooklyn Daily Eagle. 1937. "Cops question ex-lodger in triple murder." Brooklyn Daily Eagle, March 29: 1. —. 1937. "Doubts student is killer." Brooklyn Daily Eagle, April 6: 1. —. 1938. "Irwin's guilty plea." Brooklyn Daily Eagle, November 15: 10. Buffalo Evening News. 1938. "Irwin, ruled insane, sent to Dannemora." Buffalo Evening News, December 10: 1. 2015. A Crime to Remember. Directed by Jeremiah Crowell. Performed by Jeremiah Crowell. New York Daily News. 1937. "3 murdered in model's flat." New York Daily News, March 29: 1. —. 1937. "Gray hair in model's hand chief clue in triple murder." New York Daily News, March 30: 1. —. 1937. "Willful Ronnie 'made fools of men,' dad says." New York Daily News, March 30: 3. New York Times. 1938. "139-year sentence imposed on Irwin." New York Times, November 29: 48. —. 1937. "Fingerprint clues found at scene of triple murder." New York Times, March 31: 1. —. 1937. "Gedeon gets bail." New York Times, April 3: 1. —. 1937. "Gedeon questioned again in murders; solution held near." New York Times, April 1: 1. —. 1937. "Irwin flown here; boasts of killings." New York Times, June 28: 1. —. 1937. "Irwin, wild-eyed, meets reporters." New York Times, September 1: 20. —. 1937. "Women jam court to glimpse Irwin." New York Times, Jukly 1: 56. People v. Robert Irwin. 1938. 166 Misc. 751 (Court of General Sessions of the County of New York, March 24). Schechter, Harold. 2014. The Mad Sculptor: The Maniac, the Model, and the Murder That Shook the Nation. Boston, MA: New Harvest. United Press. 1937. "Sculptor hunted as triple killer in Gedeon cases." Buffalo Evening News, April 5: 1. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

56 mins

20 June Finished

Episode 574: The Kidnapping & Murder of Marion Parker (Part 2)

Episode 574: The Kidnapping & Murder of Marion Parker (Part 2)

explicit

A massive interstate search was launched to find Marion’s killer and within a few days, police arrested nineteen-year-old William Edward Hickman, a former co-worker of Perry Parker. During his interrogation, Hickman confessed to kidnapping and murdering Marion, claiming that a god he referred to as “Providence” had instructed him to do it. That confession prompted Hickman’s attorneys to take advantage of the state’s new law accepting a legal defense of not guilty by reason of insanity; however, a jury disagreed, and Hickman was found guilty and executed at San Quentin Prison the following year. Because of the shocking cruelty and brutality of the murder, the well documented and exciting search for the killer, and the sensational nature of the defense, the story of Marion Parker’s murder and the trial that followed dominated the media and occupied several pages of all the major papers across the state for months. For these reasons and more, it remains one of the most notorious murders in California history. References Associated Press. 1928. "Hickman to have new judge." Fresno Bee, January 25: 1. —. 1927. "Confession stuns mother." Los Angeles Times, December 23: 4. Berger, Jackson. 1927. "Kidnapper tries to dash out brains in frenzy." Los Angeles Times, December 25: 1. Los Angeles Record. 1927. "Hunt kidnappers of girl." Los Angeles Record, December 16: 1. Los Angeles Times. 1927. "'Fox' ponders 'crazy' plea." Los Angeles Times, December 24: 1. —. 1927. "Fugitive caught in breakneck race with Oregon officers." Los Angeles Times, December 23: 1. —. 1927. "Hickman believed in Seattle." Los Angeles Times, December 22: 1. —. 1927. "Hickman pronounced sane." Los Angeles Times, December 24: 1. —. 1927. "Hickman's finger-prints found in apartment." Los Angeles Times, December 21: 1. —. 1927. "'I liked her' declares youth while he sobs." Los Angeles Times, December 23: 1. —. 1927. "Kidnapper grows sullen when 'pal' proves alibi." Los Angeles Times, December 24: 1. —. 1928. "New crimes confessed by Hickman." Los Angeles Times, October 14: 3. —. 1928. "New horror in Hickman case." Los Angeles Times, February 2: 1. —. 1928. "Slayer makes self-analysis." Los Angeles Times, February 2: 2. Neibaur, James. 2016. Butterfly in the Rain: The 1927 Abduction and Murder of Marion Parker. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield. New York Times. 1928. "Hickman sentenced to hang April 27." New York Times, February 15: 25. —. 1928. "Hickman's father goes to his aid." New York Times, February 1: 13. —. 1927. "Youth arrested in child slaying at Los Angeles." New York Times, December 19: 1. Overton, Gerald. 1928. "Hickman goes to death on gibbet." Fresno Bee, October 19: 1. Rasmussen, Cecilia. 2001. "Girl's grisly killing had city residents up in arms." Los Angeles Times, February 4. San Francisco Examiner. 1927. "Kidnapped girl's body tossed omn lawn." San Francisco Examiner, December 18: 1. State of California v William Edward Hickman. 1928. 204 Cal. 470 (Supreme Court of California, July 5). See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

1 hour 6 mins

17 June Finished

Episode 573: The Kidnapping & Murder of Marion Parker (Part 1)

Episode 573: The Kidnapping & Murder of Marion Parker (Part 1)

explicit

On the afternoon of December 15, 1927, twelve-year-old Marion Parker was checked out of her Los Angeles junior high school by a man claiming to be an employee of her father, Perry Parker, an employee at a bank in the city. The man claimed Parker had been in an accident and he was to bring the girl to see her father, but this was just a ruse to abduct the girl. The following day, Marion’s parents received several cryptic ransom letters demanding $1,500 in gold in exchange for the safe return of their daughter. On December 17, Perry Parker delivered the money to the kidnapper, who took the money, then dumped Marion’s dead, mutilated body out of the car before speeding away. References Associated Press. 1928. "Hickman to have new judge." Fresno Bee, January 25: 1. —. 1927. "Confession stuns mother." Los Angeles Times, December 23: 4. Berger, Jackson. 1927. "Kidnapper tries to dash out brains in frenzy." Los Angeles Times, December 25: 1. Los Angeles Record. 1927. "Hunt kidnappers of girl." Los Angeles Record, December 16: 1. Los Angeles Times. 1927. "'Fox' ponders 'crazy' plea." Los Angeles Times, December 24: 1. —. 1927. "Fugitive caught in breakneck race with Oregon officers." Los Angeles Times, December 23: 1. —. 1927. "Hickman believed in Seattle." Los Angeles Times, December 22: 1. —. 1927. "Hickman pronounced sane." Los Angeles Times, December 24: 1. —. 1927. "Hickman's finger-prints found in apartment." Los Angeles Times, December 21: 1. —. 1927. "'I liked her' declares youth while he sobs." Los Angeles Times, December 23: 1. —. 1927. "Kidnapper grows sullen when 'pal' proves alibi." Los Angeles Times, December 24: 1. —. 1928. "New crimes confessed by Hickman." Los Angeles Times, October 14: 3. —. 1928. "New horror in Hickman case." Los Angeles Times, February 2: 1. —. 1928. "Slayer makes self-analysis." Los Angeles Times, February 2: 2. Neibaur, James. 2016. Butterfly in the Rain: The 1927 Abduction and Murder of Marion Parker. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield. New York Times. 1928. "Hickman sentenced to hang April 27." New York Times, February 15: 25. —. 1928. "Hickman's father goes to his aid." New York Times, February 1: 13. —. 1927. "Youth arrested in child slaying at Los Angeles." New York Times, December 19: 1. Overton, Gerald. 1928. "Hickman goes to death on gibbet." Fresno Bee, October 19: 1. Rasmussen, Cecilia. 2001. "Girl's grisly killing had city residents up in arms." Los Angeles Times, February 4. San Francisco Examiner. 1927. "Kidnapped girl's body tossed omn lawn." San Francisco Examiner, December 18: 1. State of California v William Edward Hickman. 1928. 204 Cal. 470 (Supreme Court of California, July 5). See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

57 mins

13 June Finished

Episode 572: Heavenly Creatures: The Parker-Hulme Murder

Episode 572: Heavenly Creatures: The Parker-Hulme Murder

explicit

On the afternoon of June 22, 1954, Agnes Ritchie was preparing ice cream for two customers in her shop when two teenage girls, Pauline Parker and Juliet Hulme, burst through the front door, screaming for help and saying one of their mothers had been killed. Agnes and her husband followed the girls into the nearby wooded area, where they found the badly beaten and obviously dead body of Honorah Parker. The couple wasn’t able to get much out of either girl, only that the woman had slipped and hit her head, but their behavior was strange and something about the whole scene didn’t feel right. Just two days later, Parker and Hulme were charged with the murder of Pauline’s mother, Honorah Parker. According to the prosecution, the girls had developed an intense bond and had created romantic fantasy in the months leading up to the murder that bordered on obsessiveness. In 1954, the girls’ relationship became threatened when Hulme’s parents divorced and began talking of relocating. Fearing they would be separated and never see one another again, Parker and Hulme killed Honorah, believing that her death would put an end to any plans to relocate. The story of Honorah’s murder and the trial that followed quickly spread across New Zealand and Australia and eventually made its way around the globe. Among other things, the case challenged existing beliefs about young women and their capacity for violence, but just as important were the sensational and salacious mentions of insanity and homosexuality that were often more implied than explicitly stated. Thank you to David White, of the Bring Me the Axe Podcast, for research :) References Brisbane Telegraph. 1954. "Conspired to Kill." Brisbane Telegraph, August 23: 1. —. 1954. "Teenagers remanded, police blame girl's passion for horses." Brisbane Telegraph, June 24: 1. Chun, Louise. 1995. "Slaughter by the innocents: The case of the schoolgirl killers shocked New Zealand." The Guardian, January 30. Graham, Peter. 2011. So Brilliantly Clever: Parker, Hulme and the Murder that Shocked the World. Wellington, NZ: Awa Press. Neustatter, Angela. 2003. "‘I was guilty. I did my time’: Anne Perry, the novelist whose past caught up with her." The Guardian, November 20. Newcastle Sun. 1954. "Girls shrugged at charge of murder." Newcastle Sun, July 16: 1. The Age. 1954. "Girls smile at N.Z. sentence." The Age , August 30: 1. —. 1954. "Defence says N.Z. girls insane as mother killed." The Age, August 25: 9. —. 1954. "Description of quarrel." The Age, July 17: 3. —. 1954. "Doctor says both girls certifiable." The Age, August 27: 5. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

1 hour 36 mins

10 June Finished

Episode 571: Lost Children of the Alleghenies

Episode 571: Lost Children of the Alleghenies

explicit

A community frantically searches for two missing boys who disappeared in a dense forest. Days pass with no leads, but a man's prophetic dream leads to their discovery. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

49 mins

6 June Finished

Listen Now: Happily Never After: Dan & Nancy

Listen Now: Happily Never After: Dan & Nancy

Nancy Brophy fills her novels with romantic betrayals and murder. It’s a far cry from her quiet life in the suburbs, where she and her chef husband, Dan, are living out their golden years. But when Dan is shot dead, Nancy finds herself at the center of a murder case that could be ripped from the pages of her novels. From Wondery, this is a story about what happens when the line blurs between fiction and reality.  Listen to Happily Never After: Dan & Nancy on the Wondery App or wherever you get your podcasts. You can binge episodes early and ad-free on Wondery+. Join Wondery+ in the Wondery App or on Apple Podcasts. Start your free trial by visiting Wondery.fm/HNA_DN now. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

4 mins

4 June Finished

Recommended

Show name

Title

Sub title

Now Playing

The Pat Kenny Show

Live Now: 9AM - 12PM

Presenter logo
Brand

9AM

12AM

Now Playing

The Pat Kenny Show

The Pat Kenny Show

Of The Ball

1 hour left

Today Finished


Next Up

Default

Default

default

0 mins

No Account

Subscriptions to podcast series are only available to users with an account. Sign in or register to subscribe and access your subscriptions.

Register Sign in

Woops!

Error text.