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LSE: Public lectures and events

Podcast Series LSE: Public lectures and events

The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.

Series Episodes

Money and Politics: analysing donations to UK political parties, 2000-2021

Money and Politics: analysing donations to UK political parties, 2000-2021

Contributor(s): Professor Stuart Wilks-Heeg, Alberto Parmigiani, Dr Kate Alexander Shaw | Questions over the motivation and effect of financial contributions to political parties and candidates have been a constant source of contention in the politics of democratic countries. However, difficulties accessing reliable data have often constrained research about political finance. In the UK the Electoral Commission has been recording all political donations since its foundation, with detailed information on the date, amount and type of contribution, and names of donors. This panel will discuss preliminary findings of a British Academy/Leverhulme funded study of these donations, and seek to draw broad conclusions about how British politics is funded and what we still need to know.

1 hour 24 mins

25 January Finished

Growth for Good: reshaping capitalism to save humanity from climate catastrophe

Growth for Good: reshaping capitalism to save humanity from climate catastrophe

Contributor(s): Dr Alessio Terzi, Dr Anna Valero | Historically, industrialisation, capitalism, and affluence have contributed to the emissions that are warming the planet’s atmosphere. As humanity starts to grapple with the Herculean challenge of climate change, should economic growth be abandoned to stand a chance of success? Would this lead to a better society, especially in already rich nations, freeing them from pointless consumerism? In Growth for Good, Alessio Terzi takes these legitimate concerns as a starting point to draw the reader on a journey into the socioeconomic, evolutionary, historical and cultural origins of the growth imperative. Rather than simply stating impossibilities, the book draws a credible agenda to enrol capitalism in the fight to stave off climate catastrophe. Shelving command-and-control solutions, or the complete reliance on, the market, Terzi details a plan involving an activist government, proactive business, and engaged citizens.

1 hour 32 mins

24 January Finished

Does the Muslim World Exist? A Foray into Global History and Global International Relations

Does the Muslim World Exist? A Foray into Global History and Global International Relations

Contributor(s): Professor Cemil Aydin, Professor Menderes Çınar | Muslim-majority societies – similarly to all others - have had a contested relationship with history and continue to grapple with the ideas of ‘Islam’, ‘the Muslim world’ and ‘Islamic civilisation’. It has been argued that the latter are products of global intellectual trends and power relations in the nineteenth century and that their continuing potency derive from their being used by political actors (such as the AKP in Turkey) as ideological tools. The panel will investigate these claims by exploring the historical conditions and inter-connected global power structures which brought the idea of Islam into being. It will also explore the politics surrounding its continuing survival at the current juncture of a global IR which stokes the fires of essentialist collective myths.

1 hour 28 mins

23 January Finished

Global Discord: values and power in a fractured world order

Global Discord: values and power in a fractured world order

Contributor(s): Dr Peter Wilson, Professor Stephanie J. Rickard, Professor John Bew, Sir Paul Tucker | As outlined in his new book, democracies are facing a drawn-out contest with authoritarian states entangling much of public policy with global security issues. He lays out some principles for a sustainable system of international cooperation, showing how democracies can deal with China and other illiberal states without sacrificing their deepest political values. Examples are drawn from the international monetary order, including the role of the US dollar, trade and investment regimes, and the financial system. The approach takes its inspiration from David Hume rather than the standard International Relations menu of Hobbes, Kant, or Grotius, so that each of power, norms and material interests matter. After his opening remarks, our panel engages in a discussion with Paul and each other, and questions from the audience.

1 hour 17 mins

17 January Finished

Philosophy Live: time's arrow

Philosophy Live: time's arrow

Contributor(s): Dr Anne Giersch, Claire North, Dr Bryan W Roberts, Dr Karim PY Thébault | The asymmetry between the past and the future is called the Arrow of Time. For example, the events of the past year have shaped all of us, but the future years are ours to shape. We all perceive the Arrow: we remember the start of the pandemic, but we don't "remember" or even know when it will end in the future. We have hopes about the future, but must simply accept and learn from what has happened in the past. Where do these differences come from? How do they arise in human psychology? Do they have an origin in the physical nature of space and time? What can reflecting on the difference between the past and the future tell us about our place in the post-pandemic world?

1 hour 31 mins

16 January Finished

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