The Economist Asks: Cindy McCain Image

The Economist Asks: Cindy McCain

21 January - 28 mins
Podcast Series Economist Radio

Can President Biden revive bipartisanship in America? Anne McElvoy asks the widow of Republican Senator John McCain and member of the Biden-Harris transition advisory council if Joe Biden can achieve his hopes of ‘unity’ in a divided America. After the violence at the Senate on the 6th of January, does the GOP still represent Mrs. McCain’s values and is America constitutionally strong? And, is she the next US ambassador to London? 

 

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28 mins

Series Episodes

Checks and Balance: Back problems

Checks and Balance: Back problems

“America is back” President Biden has told allies. Hard power, including a fearsome nuclear weapons arsenal, is the foundation of America’s global influence. But many Democrats would like to demilitarise foreign policy. Can Joe Biden live up to his own rhetoric as he tries to re-engage with the world?  We hear from Shashank Joshi, The Economist’s defence editor, and Fiona Hill, who advised President Trump on Russia. Our obituaries editor Ann Wroe profiles George Shultz, architect of the first arms control treaty.  John Prideaux, our US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, US digital editor. For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/USpod   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

41 mins

26 February Finished

Mutual-appreciation anxiety: Putin and Erdogan

Mutual-appreciation anxiety: Putin and Erdogan

The presidents of Turkey and Russia make an odd couple; their former empires have clashed over centuries. We look at the fragile—but nonetheless worrisome—alliance between Vladimir Putin and Recep Tayyip Erdogan. India’s economy is recovering but a longstanding drag on growth persists: the overwhelming fraction of women absent from the labour force. And an unlikely protest anthem rattles Cuba’s regime. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

20 mins

26 February Finished

The Economist Asks: Fiona Hill

The Economist Asks: Fiona Hill

How should President Joe Biden deal with President Vladimir Putin? At a point of “acute confrontation” between America and Russia, Fiona Hill, former official at the US National Security Council and expert on Russia, tells Anne McElvoy how post-Trump relations might look. Also, why Russian opposition figurehead Alexei Navalny is like Harry Potter— challenging a ruthless leader. Also, was Hill herself poisoned on a research trip in Russia in 2002? For full access to the print, digital and audio editions of The Economist subscribe at www.economist.com/podcastoffer   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

31 mins

25 February Finished

Hell for Tether: a cryptocurrency crimped

Hell for Tether: a cryptocurrency crimped

The notionally dollar-pegged “stablecoin” quietly underpins many crypto-market moves. We ask what the currency issuer’s clash with New York authorities means for the wider crypto craze. In many African countries, parliamentarians are asked to fill public-service gaps—at great personal cost. We examine moves toward a fairer forking out of funds. And why physical-education exams are popping up in China. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

22 mins

25 February Finished

Babbage: Collusions and collisions

Babbage: Collusions and collisions

After Facebook reached a deal with Australia, the tech giants are coming under fire once again -- this time from each other. Are their cosy monopolies under threat? Also, The Economist’s defence editor investigates the multi-billion dollar industry which exploits vulnerabilities in vital software. And, how whales could help the study of seismology in the ocean. Kenneth Cukier hosts  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

26 mins

24 February Finished

Let the games be thin: Tokyo’s Olympic tussles

Let the games be thin: Tokyo’s Olympic tussles

Planners are in a corner. Delaying or cancelling the summer tournament looks like defeat; pressing ahead looks like a danger. We take a look at the sporting chances. Britain has decarbonised faster than any other rich country, but getting to “net zero” will be a whole lot harder. And why South Koreans have such trouble with noisy neighbours. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

21 mins

24 February Finished

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